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Project Prepper, Part 41: 2016 Status Report

Last week in the “Project Prepper” series of posts I recapped what the series is all about for those who didn’t already know.

Today, I’m going to talk about where the project stands a little over three years in the works.

Originally, I decided my preparedness education and activities would focus on a prioritized list of six “innate survival needs” (hat-tip Jack Spirko @ The Survival Podcast). That included:

1. Security
2. Water
3. Food
4. Shelter
5. Sanitation and Health
6. Energy

In May 2015, I split up “Security” into “Physical Security” and “Financial Security” (following Spirko’s lead). The revised list now looks like this:

1. Physical Security
2. Financial Security
3. Water
4. Food
5. Sanitation and Health
6. Energy
7. Shelter

After its adoption I blogged on May 20, 2015:

“Physical Security” is still priority number one because I predict the push for more gun “control” will continue while crime simultaneously gets worse. “Financial Security” breaks into the list at number two because the most likely disaster I see on the horizon is an economic one. “Shelter” now brings up the rear as I’ve completed that move from my Chicago apartment to a house in the suburbs (plus there’s my family’s place in Wisconsin where I spend time).

In my last “status report” (December 10, 2014), I wrote:

Decent strides have been made in the area of security… Physical security on the exterior/interior of the new house has been improved, particularly with landscaping, lighting, and locks. Personal safety gear, supplies, and tools have been acquired, with training having commenced a few years back.

Concerning water, the foundation for an emergency water supply is now in place. While utilizing some water storage containers I had prior to this project, I’ve acquired additional containers. To maintain the quality of the water for an extended period of time, I purchased aerobic stabilized oxygen. I’ve also kept a couple of cases of bottled drinking water on hand, along with an emergency water containment system that holds up to 100 gallons of fresh water in a bathtub standing by in the wings. At present, my girlfriend and I have close to a week-and-a-half supply of emergency water each (based on federal government guidelines of one gallon per person per day). Even though this is significantly more than Uncle Sam’s 72-hour recommendation, I’m not comfortable with this amount.

Concerning food, the foundation for an emergency food supply is also in place. Taking advantage of price drops and gift cards, my girlfriend and I scored a relatively-inexpensive 1-week supply of high-quality freeze-dried meals each. Like with the water though, I’d like to increase that amount commensurate with the potential emergencies I’ve identified.

Concerning shelter, purchasing that house last spring was a pretty big “prep.” And it was certainly an improvement over the multi-family housing arrangement where my girlfriend and I used to live. As much as I love the city of Chicago and would have liked to stay in our northwest side neighborhood, my girlfriend and I are much better off here in a close-by suburb, all things considered.

Concerning sanitation/health, not much work has been done in this area yet. As health is concerned, I’ve acquired a good deal of basic first aid supplies and instructional material in the last couple of years. But it’s been too long since I’ve had any training in this area. It’s one of my goals in 2015 to complete an American Red Cross First Aid/CPR/AED class and build a comprehensive first aid kit- as well as having the knowledge/skills to use it. In addition, while working around the house has been good for the body, I really need to improve my physical fitness. Not only will it help me cope with the difficult times I see coming down the pipeline, but hopefully it will keep me from having to rely on our floundering health care system as much as possible.

On sanitation, an unforeseen (and somewhat costly) improvement was carried out late last year on our sewer line going from the house. I’ll spare readers the details, but a new cleanout was added on the front of the home, and with it, a check valve. Should the city’s sewer system fail for any reason (extended power grid failure?), the valve should prevent sewage from backing up into our house and through the toilets. At least, that’s how I understand it should work. When it comes to people having to “go to the bathroom” in an extended grid-down scenario and dealing with the waste, I’m already researching a number of possible solutions.

Finally, as energy is concerned, for short-term blackouts I’ve been looking at portable generators to use at first until my girlfriend and I can afford a standby generator that can be hooked up to the natural gas line coming into the house. I’m also exploring if we can’t utilize renewable sources of energy somehow. I really hope so, because it’s probably what we’ll be forced to turn to in a long-term grid-down situation. That being said, we are limited by what we can use due to our location in a major metropolitan area.

So that’s where I stand with “Project Prepper” as 2014 draws to a close. Decent progress has been made in tackling those “innate survival needs,” but there’s still a lot more work that needs to be done. Hopefully, time and money will be on my side in the new year.

“Hopefully, time and money will be on my side in the new year.”

Regrettably, “time and money” were not on my side. That being said, I was able to make some progress on “Project Prepper.” Going down that revised list of “innate survival needs”:

1. Physical Security: Additional lighting has been added around the property to illuminate the exterior of the house. More personal safety tools and gear have been acquired, along with training material purchased from affiliate marketing partner Paladin Press.

2. Financial Security: No progress, although efforts have been ongoing since 2004. More on this another time.

3. Water: Additional water storage containers have been purchased and acquired. I bought one Reliance Products Aqua-Pak 5 Gallon Rigid Water Container
via Amazon.com to try out (review forthcoming), and have been stockpiling empty 2-liter plastic bottles.

4. Food: Nothing’s been added to the existing emergency food supply. Although regular readers of Survival And Prosperity might remember the “experimental” food garden my girlfriend and I grew last year using heirloom seeds from My Patriot Supply’s Survival Seed Vault.

Cucumbersaurus Revisited

Cucumbersaurus Revisited: It was DELICIOUS, by the way

ANY CHARACTER HERE

Despite a number of rookie mistakes and other challenges, I’d say it was a success, and I can’t wait to grow another, more expanded one this year.

5. Sanitation and Health: I wasn’t able to take that American Red Cross First Aid/CPR/AED class and build a comprehensive first aid kit in 2015 like I wanted to. I have started a new workout regimen though in an effort to improve my physical fitness. I blogged back on August 26, 2015:

As for the standards I’m shooting for, I’m leaning towards those embraced by Blackwater, Inc. Founder and former CEO Erik Prince talked about them in his recently published book entitled Civilian Warriors: The Inside Story of Blackwater and the Unsung Heroes of the War on Terror:

Our employees may have been retired from the military, but Blackwater didn’t hire your typical “retiree.” After the eight-week Moyock training programs that turned those veterans into diplomatic security professionals, our final physical fitness test standards required men to run one and a half miles in less than ten minutes, forty-five seconds; execute twelve pull-ups in a row, seventy-five push-ups done in two one-minute sets, and seventy-five sit-ups in two one-minute sets; and drag a 175-pound dummy eighty feet in under one minute

(Editor: Bold added for emphasis)

6. Energy: No progress.

7. Shelter: No progress. But to be fair, the house in the Chicago suburbs was a pretty substantial prep.

I’m disappointed I didn’t accomplish more since that December 2014 status report. Particularly as I believe time is ticking before the “balloon goes up.” From this point on, I’ll need to get “time and money” back on my side to keep “Project Prepper” moving forward. I’m up to the challenge.

More next week…

Christopher E. Hill
Survival And Prosperity (www.survivalandprosperity.com)

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Illinois Emergency Management Agency: Develop Post-Disaster Communications Plan With ‘Text First, Talk Second’ Approach

Severe Weather Preparedness Month is almost over here in Illinois. But the Illinois Emergency Management Agency is still passing along valuable information to state residents on what to do when a disaster occurs. From a press release on the Illinois Government News Network website yesterday:

‘Text First, Talk Second’ Often Best Way to Contact Loved Ones When Disaster Strikes

IEMA Encourages People to Have Plan for Communicating with Family Members, Friends during Emergencies

SPRINGFIELD – When disaster strikes, your first instinct probably is to call loved ones to make sure they’re OK or let them know you’re safe. It’s likely everyone else affected by the emergency is thinking the same thing. In these instances, telephone lines can quickly become overloaded, preventing not only your call from going through but also blocking critical 911 calls.

During Severe Weather Preparedness Month in March, the Illinois Emergency Management Agency (IEMA) is encouraging people to develop a Family Communications Plan that includes the “Text First, Talk Second” concept.

“Communicating with family and friends immediately after a disaster is important,” said IEMA Director James K. Joseph. “We’re encouraging people to plan now so they’ll know how to reach their contacts in the chaotic aftermath of a disaster.”

Joseph said short, simple text messages, such as “R U OK?” and “I’m OK,” are more likely to get through to your loved ones than a phone call when phone service is disrupted. As phone congestion eases, you can follow up with a phone call to relay more information.

Data-based services like texts and emails are less likely to experience network congestion during an emergency. You can also use social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, to post your status to let family and friends know you’re OK.

While Text-to-911 is on the horizon for emergency communications, it currently is available only in limited areas of the U.S. If you need to contact 911, do so by landline or cell phone unless your community has notified you that this service is activated in your area.

Additional emergency communications tips include:

• Keep all phone calls brief by conveying only vital information to emergency personnel and/or family.
• If you are unsuccessful in completing a call using your cell phone, wait ten seconds before redialing to help reduce network congestion.
• If you lose power, you can charge your cell phone in your car. Be sure your car is in a well-ventilated place, not in a garage.
• Another resource for letting friends and family know your status after a disaster is the American Red Cross’s Safe and Well Registry at https://safeandwell.communityos.org/cms/index.php.
• Your communications plan should identify an out-of-area contact and household members should carry that information with them at all times. If a disaster occurs when you are separated, it often is easier to call outside your immediate area. Family members can call the contact to provide location and coordinate reunification plans.

For more information about developing a family communications plan, visit the Ready Illinois website at www.Ready.Illinois.gov.

Great advice regarding that “Text First, Talk Second” strategy.

Even I can text on my vintage “dumb phone” with its Shaun of the Dead ringtone.

To find out more about IEMA, you can visit their website here.

Christopher E. Hill
Survival And Prosperity (www.survivalandprosperity.com)

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Project Prepper, Part 30: Status

Last week in the “Project Prepper” series of posts I did a recap of what the series is all about for those who didn’t already know.

Today, I’m going to talk about where the project stands after a little over two years in the works.

To start, my girlfriend and I moved out of the city of Chicago last year to a house in the northwest suburbs- with an eye towards eventually settling down in Wisconsin.

I decided my preparedness education and activities will focus on a prioritized list of six “innate survival needs” (hat tip Jack Spirko @ The Survival Podcast). This includes:

1. Security
2. Water
3. Food
4. Shelter
5. Sanitation and Health
6. Energy

Concerning security, that’s something that’s been in the works for several years now. Like I wrote on this blog’s “About” page:

Survival And Prosperity is unlike other financial blogs in that SP focuses simultaneously on finance and personal safety, two areas Christopher Hill has spent a lot of time researching these past couple of years and which are intertwined in any serious discussion about surviving and prospering in tumultuous times. Case in point, an individual might pursue a strategy of wealth preservation and growth that would pay off handsomely in a financial crash. Yet, if personal safety was ignored in the process, that same individual might end up a victim of the social turmoil that is sure to accompany the economic collapse. So much for that new-found wealth, right?

(Editor’s note: Blog added for emphasis)

Decent strides have been made in the area of security, although plenty of work remains with all those “innate survival needs.” Physical security on the exterior/interior of the new house has been improved, particularly with landscaping, lighting, and locks. Personal safety gear, supplies, and tools have been acquired, with training having commenced a few years back.

New Tools: United Cutlery Honshu Tantos

New Tools: United Cutlery Honshu Tantos

Purchased @ BUDK.com For $36.99 (Stainless), $39.99 (Black)

Concerning water, the foundation for an emergency water supply is now in place. While utilizing some water storage containers I had prior to this project, I’ve acquired additional containers. To maintain the quality of the water for an extended period of time, I purchased aerobic stabilized oxygen. I’ve also kept a couple of cases of bottled drinking water on hand, along with an emergency water containment system that holds up to 100 gallons of fresh water in a bathtub standing by in the wings. At present, my girlfriend and I have close to a week-and-a-half supply of emergency water each (based on federal government guidelines of one gallon per person per day). Even though this is significantly more than Uncle Sam’s 72-hour recommendation, I’m not comfortable with this amount.

Concerning food, the foundation for an emergency food supply is also in place. Taking advantage of price drops and gift cards, my girlfriend and I scored a relatively-inexpensive 1-week supply of high-quality freeze-dried meals each. Like with the water though, I’d like to increase that amount commensurate with the potential emergencies I’ve identified.

Concerning shelter, purchasing that house last spring was a pretty big “prep.” And it was certainly an improvement over the multi-family housing arrangement where my girlfriend and I used to live. As much as I love the city of Chicago and would have liked to stay in our northwest side neighborhood, my girlfriend and I are much better off here in a close-by suburb, all things considered.

Concerning sanitation/health, not much work has been done in this area yet. As health is concerned, I’ve acquired a good deal of basic first aid supplies and instructional material in the last couple of years. But it’s been too long since I’ve had any training in this area. It’s one of my goals in 2015 to complete an American Red Cross First Aid/CPR/AED class and build a comprehensive first aid kit- as well as having the knowledge/skills to use it. In addition, while working around the house has been good for the body, I really need to improve my physical fitness. Not only will it help me cope with the difficult times I see coming down the pipeline, but hopefully it will keep me from having to rely on our floundering health care system as much as possible.

On sanitation, an unforeseen (and somewhat costly) improvement was carried out late last year on our sewer line going from the house. I’ll spare readers the details, but a new cleanout was added on the front of the home, and with it, a check valve. Should the city’s sewer system fail for any reason (extended power grid failure?), the valve should prevent sewage from backing up into our house and through the toilets. At least, that’s how I understand it should work. When it comes to people having to “go to the bathroom” in an extended grid-down scenario and dealing with the waste, I’m already researching a number of possible solutions.

Finally, as energy is concerned, for short-term blackouts I’ve been looking at portable generators to use at first until my girlfriend and I can afford a standby generator that can be hooked up to the natural gas line coming into the house. I’m also exploring if we can’t utilize renewable sources of energy somehow. I really hope so, because it’s probably what we’ll be forced to turn to in a long-term grid-down situation. That being said, we are limited by what we can use due to our location in a major metropolitan area.

So that’s where I stand with “Project Prepper” as 2014 draws to a close. Decent progress has been made in tackling those “innate survival needs,” but there’s still a lot more work that needs to be done. Hopefully, time and money will be on my side in the new year.

By Christopher E. Hill
Survival And Prosperity (www.survivalandprosperity.com)

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Project Prepper, Part 21: Progress Report

Late August was when I last published a “Project Prepper” post. Because it’s been a few months, I want to take some time tonight to put together a “progress report” on how far I’ve come with my “preps” to date.

Back on February 27, I blogged that my preparedness activities as part of the “Project Prepper” series of posts would focus on the following 6 “innate survival needs.” In order of the priority I assigned to them:

• Security
• Water
• Food
• Shelter
• Sanitation and Health
• Energy

And why was it I made “Security” priority number one? I wrote in February:

Still, my gut feeling tells me right now I should be focusing on “Security” before other needs. Why’s that? Because this latest push for more gun “control” that’s going on in America right now could end up limiting my access to a number of tools and other accessories that I could use to construct an effective security setup.

I added later in the post:

Also, I’d feel more comfortable getting a jump on Water and Food (with water being more of a priority as a person can only last around three days without it, as opposed to around three weeks without food).

As for Shelter? Well, I’ve already done some work in this area as a number of readers already know, making plans to move out of the City of Chicago to the Northwest suburbs in late spring, with hopes of eventually acquiring a homestead in Southeast Wisconsin in a few years.

Finally, not much will probably be done regarding Energy and Sanitation/Health until after the move to the suburbs. But I do plan on getting some American Red Cross First Aid/CPR/AED instruction as soon as I can.

So, how am I doing with my preps?

Breaking them down:

Security- Truth be told, I had already been working on this area since 2009 when it became all too clear to me that wealth doesn’t do one much good when it can’t be protected. Subsequently, I have a number of different personal safety tools at my disposal now. I’m planning on adding more tools, related accessories, and lots of training as funds permit down the road. No time to rest on my laurels here (push for gun and other “control” relentless).

Water- Regular readers of Survival And Prosperity know that I’ve made quite a bit of headway in this area as well. For starters, I wanted to make sure my girlfriend and I had at least a two-week emergency supply of water for each of us. To achieve this, I acquired some new storage containers and purchased cases of commercially-bottled mineral water. As it stands right now, I have the capability of storing 25.11 gallons of emergency water in the containers, giving me and my girlfriend a 12.56 day supply of water each for drinking and sanitation if following Ready.gov’s calculations (at least one gallon of water per person per day). With the bottled water, we’re easily at that two-week mark.

Still, I plan on acquiring even more emergency water and storing it in used 2-liter bottles that have been thoroughly cleaned out, in addition to occasionally purchasing more cases of commercially-bottled mineral water when they’re on sale every once in a while.

Food- Haven’t made much progress in this area yet. Making a priority in the coming weeks.

Shelter- A lot’s been done in this area over the last several months. The plan to move out of the city of Chicago to the Northwest suburbs in late spring was realized, with the urban apartment exchanged for a single-family house in the suburbs. The acquisition of a homestead in Wisconsin still remains the goal. In the meantime, the house in the ‘burbs will serve as my “Project Prepper Lab.”

Sanitation and Health- Not much progress yet. Looking to book a American Red Cross First Aid/CPR/AED class in the coming weeks.

Energy- Not much progress yet.

That’s it for my preparedness “progress report.” While I’m pleased with the progress made so far in the areas of Security, Shelter, and Water, I’ve barely touched Food, Sanitation/Health, and Energy.

Lots more work to do to satisfy these “innate survival needs.”

By Christopher E. Hill
Survival And Prosperity (www.survivalandprosperity.com)

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Project Prepper, Part 19: Emergency Water Supply Helpful Info

I know I’ve been blogging quite a bit about the emergency water supply I’m trying to put together at the new residence, so I anticipate this will be my last major post about the topic for a while.

Now, that being said, I want to share with readers some helpful information I’ve recently come across concerning the long-term storage of this water.

First off, I wanted to ensure that when I socked my emergency water away, I’d be doing it “correctly.” I found comprehensive instructions on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website, under “Water-Related Emergencies & Outbreaks,” “Personal Preparation and Storage of Safe Water.” Topics covered include:

-Create a Disaster Supplies Kit
-Prepare an Emergency Water Supply
-Water Containers (Cleaning and Storage)
-Make Water Safe
-Finding Emergency Water Sources

You can view this info on the CDC website here.

Second, I had heard that when storing water long-term in containers like my new Moeller Scepter and WaterBricks, I needed to use bleach/other chemicals to prevent the water from going bad. Apparently, this might not be true. From the American Red Cross/FEMA publication Food and Water in an Emergency:

Filling water storage containers

Fill the bottle to the top with regular tap water. (If your water utility company treats your tap water with chlorine, you do not need to add anything else to the water to keep it clean.) If the water you are using comes from a well or water source that is not treated with chlorine, add two drops of non-scented liquid household chlorine bleach to each gallon of water.

(Editor’s note: Italics added for emphasis)

A quick check of my water provider revealed tonight that my tap water is indeed treated with chlorine. Great. No chlorine bleach needed then.

You can read that FEMA/American Red Cross publication here.

Next, I mentioned previously that I’d be purchasing commercially-bottled water as part of my preps. But I wasn’t sure if purified water or spring water was the better choice for an emergency water supply. Then I came across an article entitled “Water For Health And Longevity” by Lawrence Wilson, M.D. Dr. Wilson, a nutrition consultant, recommended spring water, saying:

The best water to drink is usually plain spring water. In my experience, it does not matter if it comes in plastic bottles… I have found pure spring water to be the best type of drinking water in many cases because it hydrates the body well, and it supplies many needed minerals. Overall, it is clean and healthful when approved by the government, and it has other invigorating properties due to the natural processing it has been through.

Spring water it is then. As a matter of fact, after reading last night what Dr. Wilson wrote, I headed out to the Walgreens just down the street from me and picked up two 24-bottle cases of Ice Mountain spring water ($7.19 with tax) for my stash.

You can read Dr. Wilson’s article here.

Finally, I’ve been curious about how long I can store the water for. To answer this, I utilized the CDC website again. Under “Water-Related Emergencies & Outbreaks,” “Personal Preparation and Storage of Safe Water,” “Prepare an Emergency Water Supply”:

Observe the expiration date for store-bought water; replace other stored water every six months.

Those cases of Ice Mountain spring water? The packaging says the water’s good until January 2015. Nice.

Well, that’s it for my emergency water supply for now. Time to clean, sterilize, dry-out, and fill all those water containers up, and store them and the bottled spring water in my cool basement.

If you’d like to share any helpful info concerning the storage of emergency water, please feel free to comment.

(Editor’s note: Links added to “Resources” page)

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Project Prepper, Part 9: Prioritizing And Balancing My Preparedness Activity Going Forward

Back on February 7, I blogged about Jack Spirko of The Survival Podcast-fame and his insistence on preparedness focusing on 6 “innate survival needs:”

• Food
• Water
• Shelter
• Energy
• Security
• Sanitation and Health

I declared:

I’ve come across similar lists in the preparedness material I’ve studied. But now I’m inspired to make these “needs” the focus of my “Project Prepper” series of posts going forward.

Where to begin, where to begin? Well, time to hit the prepping/survivalism-related books and material cluttering my home office and elsewhere around my pad for ideas.

Which is what I did. And according to SurvivalBlog.com editor James Wesley, Rawles, where to begin doesn’t seem to be as important as balancing the preparedness activity. He wrote in his book How to Survive the End of the World as We Know It: Tactics, Techniques, and Technologies for Uncertain Timesicon:

Don’t go overboard in one area at the expense of another. Preparedness takes balance… Maintaining that balance takes both focused planning and self-control.

Still, my gut feeling tells me right now I should be focusing on “Security” before other needs. Why’s that? Because this latest push for more gun “control” that’s going on in America right now could end up limiting my access to a number of tools and other accessories that I could use to construct an effective security setup.

Also, I’d feel more comfortable getting a jump on Water and Food (with water being more of a priority as a person can only last around three days without it, as opposed to around three weeks without food).

As for Shelter? Well, I’ve already done some work in this area as a number of readers already know, making plans to move out of the City of Chicago to the Northwest suburbs in late spring, with hopes of eventually acquiring a homestead in Southeast Wisconsin in a few years.

Finally, not much will probably be done regarding Energy and Sanitation/Health until after the move to the suburbs. But I do plan on getting some American Red Cross First Aid/CPR/AED instruction as soon as I can.

As a result, that list of 6 “innate survival needs” that my preparedness efforts will focus on has now been reordered to look like this:

• Security
• Water
• Food
• Shelter
• Sanitation and Health
• Energy

Still, I will strive to keep these efforts balanced, as Rawles suggests.

By Christopher E. Hill, Editor
Survival And Prosperity (www.survivalandprosperity.com)

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Make A Plan, Continued

Since the end of August/early September, I’ve been blogging more consistently on Survival And Prosperity. However, most of the material has focused on new surprises and obstacles that have emerged with the global financial system, the U.S. economy, our society, the list goes on. Add this to the challenges already in place… and protecting and growing self and wealth gets more difficult.

Still, I hope the ideas discussed in this blog might contribute to these efforts.

With that being said, I’d like to take back up the topic of general preparedness, and resurrect an American Red Cross publication I last talked about on April 27 (my how time flies). I wrote:

Since March, I’ve been talking about the American Red Cross information sheet “Be Red Cross Ready,” a terrific launching-point for those wanting to prepare for future emergencies and disasters, and those three vital actions that can make all the difference in such events- be informed, make a plan, and get a kit. I’ve focused on “be informed” the past couple of weeks. Now let’s move on to “make a plan.”

In that April post, I republished what the Red Cross said about making a plan. I also said that I’d discuss those points in more detail. Today I’d like to do that.

First, there’s evacuating from the neighborhood in an emergency. From the sheet:

Choose two places to meet:

• Right outside your home in case of a sudden emergency, such as a fire
Outside your neighborhood, in case you cannot return home or are asked to evacuate

(Editor’s note: Italics added for emphasis)

When putting together the neighborhood evacuation plan, consider the following:

• Pick a meeting place outside the neighborhood that is easily-identifiable and accessible by foot, if possible. A friend’s/relative’s home could be ideal (be sure to talk to them about your plans though). A hotel/motel works too, but keep in mind there might not be any vacancies in the event of an emergency. Keep their contact info handy to book a room ASAP.
• If pets will be along for the journey, make sure the friend/relative knows about your companion. If you decide to go the hotel/motel route, check beforehand to make sure the accommodations are pet-friendly, or identify animal shelters along the evacuation route and nearby your destination if not.
• Plan two (2) routes for each direction (North, South, East, and West), as there may be a number of obstacles (debris? bridge out?) in place during an emergency. Try to avoid common routes that may be congested in an emergency.
• Plot all this information on maps and distribute them to each member of the household, who should then keep them readily-available. While electronic maps are nice, printed maps are less prone to being inaccessible.
• The household should practice evacuating the neighborhood twice a year and make note of any changes (construction sites?) that need to be made to the pre-planned evacuation routes.

Second, there’s the out-of-area emergency contact person. From the sheet:

Choose an out-of-area emergency contact person. It may be easier to text or call long distance if local phone lines are overloaded or out of service.

(Editor’s note: Italics added for emphasis)

When selecting this individual, consider the following:

• The person should have voice mail or an answering machine
• In the event of an emergency, household members should listen to the radio/ watch TV for telephone use instructions, then phone the out-of-area contact person to say how and where they are, and what their plans are
• The call should be kept short, and arrange to call the contact person back at a specified time for another check-in, if possible
• Incorporate the latest communications technology (e-mail, texting) accordingly

The remainder of “make a plan” was pretty straightforward. Feel free to leave a comment with your suggestions as it relates to this section of the American Red Cross’ “Be Red Cross Ready” information sheet.

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Survival And Prosperity
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Christopher E. Hill, Editor

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