seeds

The Green Suite Of Chicago Offering Window Farming For Beginners, DIY Solar Electricity Classes In March

Nick Conrad and The Green Suite of Chicago (first blogged about here in January 2014) will be offering instruction in “window farming” and solar electricity next month. From their website:

DIY Solar Electricity
Thursday, March 2, 2017
7:00pm -9:00pm
Green House Loft (map)

Class Info

Wouldn’t it be awesome to harness your own electricity from the sun? Solar energy is green, silent and a lot easier to build than you think.

This DIY class will cover the basics of electricity as well as how to design, build, and install your own solar panel system. In addition to solar electricity, we will discuss other sources of renewable energy such as wind and geothermal power. The class concludes with hands-on experience assembling part of an actual solar panel.

You will walk away from this course with the basic knowledge needed to start generating your own solar energy at home…and for a lot less money than you thought!

As I type this, 11 spots are still open for the class. Cost is only $30.

Regarding that window farming class:

Window Farming for Beginners
Sunday, March 5, 2017
3:00pm-5:00pm
Green House Loft (map)

Class Info

Have you always wanted to start a garden but don’t have the space or knowledge? Window farming is inexpensive and easy way to grow your own food right in your window! Constructed from recycled materials, window farms are perfect for small apartments with limited space.

The class consists of a 1hr introduction to the basics of hydroponics, window farming and seed cultivation followed by a thirty-minute workshop. In the workshop you will make a small hydroponic planter to take home with you. Each student should bring one empty plastic bottle. (12-32oz is best)

Anyone can learn how to grow fresh, organic food, hydroponically. Enroll today and you’ll learn how to grow your own food, save money and turn trash into treasure!

What to bring

Each student should bring one empty plastic bottle. (12-32oz is best)

As I type this, 11 spots are still open for the class. Cost again is only $30.

For more information about the instruction and how to enroll, head over to The Green Suite website here. You can also register for classes on the Dabble Chicago website here.

By Christopher E. Hill
Survival And Prosperity (www.survivalandprosperity.com)

(Editor’s note: Posting of information about any instruction is not to be construed as being a recommendation from this blog and its editor, unless specifically indicated. I am not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented herein.)

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Project Prepper, Part 41: 2016 Status Report

Last week in the “Project Prepper” series of posts I recapped what the series is all about for those who didn’t already know.

Today, I’m going to talk about where the project stands a little over three years in the works.

Originally, I decided my preparedness education and activities would focus on a prioritized list of six “innate survival needs” (hat-tip Jack Spirko @ The Survival Podcast). That included:

1. Security
2. Water
3. Food
4. Shelter
5. Sanitation and Health
6. Energy

In May 2015, I split up “Security” into “Physical Security” and “Financial Security” (following Spirko’s lead). The revised list now looks like this:

1. Physical Security
2. Financial Security
3. Water
4. Food
5. Sanitation and Health
6. Energy
7. Shelter

After its adoption I blogged on May 20, 2015:

“Physical Security” is still priority number one because I predict the push for more gun “control” will continue while crime simultaneously gets worse. “Financial Security” breaks into the list at number two because the most likely disaster I see on the horizon is an economic one. “Shelter” now brings up the rear as I’ve completed that move from my Chicago apartment to a house in the suburbs (plus there’s my family’s place in Wisconsin where I spend time).

In my last “status report” (December 10, 2014), I wrote:

Decent strides have been made in the area of security… Physical security on the exterior/interior of the new house has been improved, particularly with landscaping, lighting, and locks. Personal safety gear, supplies, and tools have been acquired, with training having commenced a few years back.

Concerning water, the foundation for an emergency water supply is now in place. While utilizing some water storage containers I had prior to this project, I’ve acquired additional containers. To maintain the quality of the water for an extended period of time, I purchased aerobic stabilized oxygen. I’ve also kept a couple of cases of bottled drinking water on hand, along with an emergency water containment system that holds up to 100 gallons of fresh water in a bathtub standing by in the wings. At present, my girlfriend and I have close to a week-and-a-half supply of emergency water each (based on federal government guidelines of one gallon per person per day). Even though this is significantly more than Uncle Sam’s 72-hour recommendation, I’m not comfortable with this amount.

Concerning food, the foundation for an emergency food supply is also in place. Taking advantage of price drops and gift cards, my girlfriend and I scored a relatively-inexpensive 1-week supply of high-quality freeze-dried meals each. Like with the water though, I’d like to increase that amount commensurate with the potential emergencies I’ve identified.

Concerning shelter, purchasing that house last spring was a pretty big “prep.” And it was certainly an improvement over the multi-family housing arrangement where my girlfriend and I used to live. As much as I love the city of Chicago and would have liked to stay in our northwest side neighborhood, my girlfriend and I are much better off here in a close-by suburb, all things considered.

Concerning sanitation/health, not much work has been done in this area yet. As health is concerned, I’ve acquired a good deal of basic first aid supplies and instructional material in the last couple of years. But it’s been too long since I’ve had any training in this area. It’s one of my goals in 2015 to complete an American Red Cross First Aid/CPR/AED class and build a comprehensive first aid kit- as well as having the knowledge/skills to use it. In addition, while working around the house has been good for the body, I really need to improve my physical fitness. Not only will it help me cope with the difficult times I see coming down the pipeline, but hopefully it will keep me from having to rely on our floundering health care system as much as possible.

On sanitation, an unforeseen (and somewhat costly) improvement was carried out late last year on our sewer line going from the house. I’ll spare readers the details, but a new cleanout was added on the front of the home, and with it, a check valve. Should the city’s sewer system fail for any reason (extended power grid failure?), the valve should prevent sewage from backing up into our house and through the toilets. At least, that’s how I understand it should work. When it comes to people having to “go to the bathroom” in an extended grid-down scenario and dealing with the waste, I’m already researching a number of possible solutions.

Finally, as energy is concerned, for short-term blackouts I’ve been looking at portable generators to use at first until my girlfriend and I can afford a standby generator that can be hooked up to the natural gas line coming into the house. I’m also exploring if we can’t utilize renewable sources of energy somehow. I really hope so, because it’s probably what we’ll be forced to turn to in a long-term grid-down situation. That being said, we are limited by what we can use due to our location in a major metropolitan area.

So that’s where I stand with “Project Prepper” as 2014 draws to a close. Decent progress has been made in tackling those “innate survival needs,” but there’s still a lot more work that needs to be done. Hopefully, time and money will be on my side in the new year.

“Hopefully, time and money will be on my side in the new year.”

Regrettably, “time and money” were not on my side. That being said, I was able to make some progress on “Project Prepper.” Going down that revised list of “innate survival needs”:

1. Physical Security: Additional lighting has been added around the property to illuminate the exterior of the house. More personal safety tools and gear have been acquired, along with training material purchased from affiliate marketing partner Paladin Press.

2. Financial Security: No progress, although efforts have been ongoing since 2004. More on this another time.

3. Water: Additional water storage containers have been purchased and acquired. I bought one Reliance Products Aqua-Pak 5 Gallon Rigid Water Container
via Amazon.com to try out (review forthcoming), and have been stockpiling empty 2-liter plastic bottles.

4. Food: Nothing’s been added to the existing emergency food supply. Although regular readers of Survival And Prosperity might remember the “experimental” food garden my girlfriend and I grew last year using heirloom seeds from My Patriot Supply’s Survival Seed Vault.

Cucumbersaurus Revisited

Cucumbersaurus Revisited: It was DELICIOUS, by the way

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Despite a number of rookie mistakes and other challenges, I’d say it was a success, and I can’t wait to grow another, more expanded one this year.

5. Sanitation and Health: I wasn’t able to take that American Red Cross First Aid/CPR/AED class and build a comprehensive first aid kit in 2015 like I wanted to. I have started a new workout regimen though in an effort to improve my physical fitness. I blogged back on August 26, 2015:

As for the standards I’m shooting for, I’m leaning towards those embraced by Blackwater, Inc. Founder and former CEO Erik Prince talked about them in his recently published book entitled Civilian Warriors: The Inside Story of Blackwater and the Unsung Heroes of the War on Terror:

Our employees may have been retired from the military, but Blackwater didn’t hire your typical “retiree.” After the eight-week Moyock training programs that turned those veterans into diplomatic security professionals, our final physical fitness test standards required men to run one and a half miles in less than ten minutes, forty-five seconds; execute twelve pull-ups in a row, seventy-five push-ups done in two one-minute sets, and seventy-five sit-ups in two one-minute sets; and drag a 175-pound dummy eighty feet in under one minute

(Editor: Bold added for emphasis)

6. Energy: No progress.

7. Shelter: No progress. But to be fair, the house in the Chicago suburbs was a pretty substantial prep.

I’m disappointed I didn’t accomplish more since that December 2014 status report. Particularly as I believe time is ticking before the “balloon goes up.” From this point on, I’ll need to get “time and money” back on my side to keep “Project Prepper” moving forward. I’m up to the challenge.

More next week…

Christopher E. Hill
Survival And Prosperity (www.survivalandprosperity.com)

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Project Prepper, Part 39: Food Garden Latest

Last time I published a “Project Prepper” post, I discussed how I planted a small food garden back in late June using some non-GMO heirloom seeds from Salt Lake City-based My Patriot Supply. I was pleased the seeds from the Survival Seed Vault were actually germinating, and the food garden producing. In that September post, I noted cucumbers had already been harvested, and “everything else looks well on its way (fingers crossed!)”

Well, here’s what’s transpired since then…

The weather’s been pretty decent except for a cold spell that lasted a couple of days (ended yesterday) and not much rain (I’ve been pretty religious about watering the food garden however). Even nicer weather is supposed to be headed our way.

As such, a good portion of the raised bed behind my garage has become a tangled green “mess.” I wrote on September 23:

I planted those cucumber and watermelon seeds in 2 different “mounds” (12 inch diameter) with 3 seeds per mound (a couple of inches apart). Based on the significant growth that’s taking place, I’m pretty sure the size of those mounds and spacing between the seeds should have been quite a bit larger.

Now I know for sure that the size of those mounds and spacing between seeds should have been larger. I fear I “suffocated” growth in that area of the food garden as a result.

A couple of watermelons were growing pretty rapidly in the raised garden bed. The local wildlife claimed two of them. Two more were really beginning to fill out when I did something stupid. In an attempt to raise them off the ground a little bit to protect them from critters, I must have bent the joints (where the melon attached to the vine?) too much, causing them to break completely off the plant shortly thereafter. I was left with two small, unripe watermelons as a result.

Small Watermelons

As these Crimson Sweets were supposed to reach 24 pounds on average, looking at those tiny melons I couldn’t help but think of that scene from the 1984 film This Is Spinal Tap where the rock band commissions a Stonehenge set but mistakenly asks for a model with a height of 18 inches instead of 18 feet. Comical stuff.


“This is Spinal Tap- Stonehenge scene”
(Warning! Language)
YouTube Video

Now, I have had further success with the food garden. Particularly in the sweet corn department. Last week, I harvested a couple of ears of corn. They were delicious- even thought I suspect they may have been just a tad overripe. I usually eat sweet corn with butter slathered all over it. Not this time! It was great plain.

First Sweet Corn

Alas, certain inhabitants of our “wildlife refuge” (my guess is the squirrels) also have discovered how good garden-fresh corn is, and the remaining unripe ears are now history. Along with the stalks. Vicious bastards.

One last thing. By late summer I noticed a good deal of discoloration among a number of corn stalk and cucumber leaves. It’s especially more pronounced with the cucumber plants, where leaves turned yellow to brown, dried out, and eventually shriveled off- but the actual cucumber wasn’t affected. I’ll definitely be looking into why this is going on.

That’s it for now. I like to refer to the small food garden as the “experimental” garden. I knew from the onset that there would be ups and downs associated with it. And sure enough, that’s been case with this project. Still, it’s producing (would have liked a watermelon however) and the knowledge I’m gaining from actually growing a food garden has been substantial.

More soon…

Christopher E. Hill
Survival And Prosperity (www.survivalandprosperity.com)

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Project Prepper, Part 38: Food Garden And Survival Seeds Update

Back on March 30, I blogged about starting a food garden. From that post:

I hope to achieve a number of things from this food garden:

• Better nutrition
• Better health
• Improved food security

I went into more detail about that garden on April 27. I wrote:

I purchased heirloom seeds put together by My Patriot Supply, an affiliate marketing partner of Survival And Prosperity (discussed here). In particular, I purchased a flagship product of theirs called the Survival Seed Vault. From the website of the now Salt Lake City, Utah-based “Patriot Owned Survival Store”:

The Survival Seed Vault contains only the highest quality heirloom vegetable survival seeds. These Patriot Seeds are 100% Non-GMO, open-pollinated and placed in specially sealed packets allowing for long term storage…

• 20 varieties of hardy heirloom survival seeds passed down from our forefathers.
• Survival seeds rated for 5+ years of storage at 75F, longer at lower temperatures.
• No hybrids, GMOs, or outdated survival seeds. All harvested seeds are reusable.
• Each seed bank is hand-inspected and packed by our American staff to ensure quality.
• Includes detailed survival seed saving guide.

Survival Seed Vault contents

Survival Seed Vault contents

ANY CHARACTER HERE

In that April post I mentioned “I plan on starting small with the food garden.” And that’s what I did. In June, my girlfriend and I prepped two areas in our fenced-in backyard which receive lots of sunlight. The first consisted of an existing raised bed along the east-facing rear wall of our garage, while the second was originally part of our lawn, in which grass was removed and transplanted elsewhere. In both areas, my girlfriend and I mixed in Dr. Earth-brand organic soil to the existing soil, along with some peat moss.

On June 27, the following went into this concoction within the raised bed:

• Scarlet Nantes Carrot- about two dozen or so heirloom seeds of over 800 provided in the Survival Seed Vault
• Marketmore Cucumber- 3 heirloom seeds of over 150 provided
• Golden Bantam Sweet Corn- 8 heirloom seeds of over 250 provided
• Crimson Sweet Watermelon- 3 heirloom seeds of over 60

Ringing this all in was a plastic safety fence donated by my girlfriend’s sister stapled to several scrap wood “posts,” with a few marigolds strategically placed within to help deter rodents (or so I’m told).

Into the other garden bed (not raised) went two blueberry and two raspberry plants, also with a number of marigolds “protecting” them.

Food garden- July 2015

Food garden- July 2015

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Here’s how everything’s been working out so far:

• We initially lost a number of seeds/seedlings to the “wildlife refuge” on our property. That includes a bunch of carrots, 3 sweet corns, and 1 cucumber. I only replaced those 3 sweet corn seeds (about 2 weeks later).
• Animals managed to chew several openings in the plastic safety fence and take 2 small watermelons (as far as I can tell). Chicken wire is a better fencing option.
• The marigolds have been doing great. So good I think they’re interfering with the growth of the raspberry plants.
• I planted those cucumber and watermelon seeds in 2 different “mounds” (12 inch diameter) with 3 seeds per mound (a couple of inches apart). Based on the significant growth that’s taking place, I’m pretty sure the size of those mounds and spacing between the seeds should have been quite a bit larger.

Despite all the above, the food garden is producing. Right now, only cucumbers have been harvested, and they’re delicious!

Cucumbersaurus

Cucumbersaurus- when you let these babies grow!

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While there’s been nothing from the blueberry/raspberry plants, everything else looks well on its way (fingers crossed!).

Food garden- September 2015

Food garden- September 2015

ANY CHARACTER HERE

Hopefully, The Old Farmer’s Almanac forecast of above-average warmth for the area in September and October holds.

I’ll report back on the food garden in a later “Project Prepper” post.

In the meantime, I’m pleased to know I can grow something else besides that lima bean plant from Mrs. Muldoon’s 3rd grade class.

In all seriousness though, I’m grateful for the knowledge towards achieving food security this experience is providing me.

Christopher E. Hill
Survival And Prosperity (www.survivalandprosperity.com)

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Wednesday, September 23rd, 2015 Agriculture, Food, Gardening, Preparedness, Project Prepper No Comments

The Green Suite Of Chicago Offering Window Farming For Beginners, DIY Solar Electricity Classes

Nick Conrad and The Green Suite of Chicago (first blogged about here in January 2014) will be offering instruction in “window farming” and solar electricity in the coming weeks. From their website:

Window Farming for Beginners
Wednesday, September 30, 2015
7:00pm-9:00pm
The Green Suite (map)

Class Info

Have you always wanted to start a garden but don’t have the space or knowledge? Window farming is inexpensive and easy way to grow your own food right in your window! Constructed from recycled materials, window farms are perfect for small apartments with limited space.

The class consists of a 1hr introduction to the basics of hydroponics, window farming and seed cultivation followed by a thirty-minute workshop. In the workshop you will make a small hydroponic planter to take home with you. Each student should bring one empty plastic bottle. (12-32oz is best)

Anyone can learn how to grow fresh, organic food, hydroponically. Enroll today and you’ll learn how to grow your own food, save money and turn trash into treasure!

What to bring

Each student should bring one empty plastic bottle. (12-32oz is best)

As I type this, 10 spots are still open for the class. Cost is only $30.

Regarding that solar electricity class:

DIY Solar Electricity
Wednesday, October 7, 2015
7:00pm -9:00pm
The Green Suite (map)

Class Info

Wouldn’t it be awesome to harness your own electricity from the sun? Solar energy is green, silent and a lot easier to build than you think.

This DIY class will cover the basics of electricity as well as how to design, build, and install your own solar panel system. In addition to solar electricity, we will discuss other sources of renewable energy such as wind and geothermal power. The class concludes with hands-on experience assembling part of an actual solar panel.

You will walk away from this course with the basic knowledge needed to start generating your own solar energy at home…and for a lot less money than you thought!

As I type this, 10 spots are still open for the class. Cost is once again only $30.

For more information about the instruction and how to enroll, head over to The Green Suite website here.

Christopher E. Hill
Survival And Prosperity (www.survivalandprosperity.com)

(Editor’s note: Posting of information about any third-party instruction is not to be construed as being a recommendation from Survival And Prosperity and its editor, unless specifically indicated. I am not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented herein.)

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Thursday, September 10th, 2015 Agriculture, Energy, Farming, Food, Preparedness, Training No Comments

The Green Suite Of Chicago Offering Window Farming For Beginners, DIY Solar Electricity Classes In Late July

The Green Suite of Chicago (first blogged about here in January 2014) will be offering instruction in “window farming” and solar electricity in the coming weeks. From the Facebook page of Nick Conrad and the school on July 9:

So happy to be teaming up with The Shift for our July classes! I will be teaching both my Hydroponics for Beginners (July 21st) and DIY Solar Electricity (July 28th). We still have a few spots left in both classes. Get them before they’re gone!

Per the The Shift’s website for the hydroponics class:

Window Farming for Beginners

$20 Purchase required to enroll

Tuesday, July 21
6pm – 8pm
Led by Nick Conrad

Have you always wanted to start a garden but don’t have the space or knowledge? Window farming is an inexpensive and easy way to grow your own food right in your window! Constructed from recycled materials, window farms are perfect for small apartments with limited space.

The class consists of a 1 hour introduction to the basics of hydroponics, window farming, and seed cultivation followed by a 30 minute workshop in which you will make a small hydroponic planter to take home with you!

Anyone can learn how to grow fresh, organic food, hydroponically. Enroll today and you’ll learn how to grow your own food, save money and turn trash into treasure!

Each student should bring one empty plastic bottle (12-32oz is best).

Regarding that solar electricity class:

DIY Solar Electricity

$20 Purchase required to enroll

Tuesday, July 28
6pm – 8pm
Led by Nick Conrad

Wouldn’t it be awesome to harness your own electricity from the sun? Solar energy is green, silent and a lot easier to build than you think.

This DIY class will cover the basics of electricity as well as how to design, build, and install your own solar panel system. In addition to solar electricity, we will discuss other sources of renewable energy such as wind and geothermal power. The class concludes with hands-on experience assembling part of an actual solar panel.

You will walk away from this course with the basic knowledge needed to start generating your own solar energy at home…and for a lot less money than you thought!

For more information about the instruction and how to enroll, head over to The Shift’s website here under “Events.” And to learn more about The Green Suite, visit their site here.

Christopher E. Hill
Survival And Prosperity (www.survivalandprosperity.com)

(Editor’s note: Posting of information about any third-party instruction is not to be construed as being a recommendation from Survival And Prosperity and its editor, unless specifically indicated. I am not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented herein.)

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Project Prepper, Part 34: Food Garden And Survival Seeds

In the last “Project Prepper” post, I blogged about starting a food garden. Progress has been slow (then again, frost warnings are still going out around here in the Chicago suburbs), but at least the fruit and vegetable seeds are on their way. I purchased heirloom seeds put together by My Patriot Supply, an affiliate marketing partner of Survival And Prosperity (discussed here). In particular, I purchased a flagship product of theirs called the Survival Seed Vault. From the website of the now Salt Lake City, Utah-based “Patriot Owned Survival Store”:

The Survival Seed Vault contains only the highest quality heirloom vegetable survival seeds. These Patriot Seeds are 100% Non-GMO, open-pollinated and placed in specially sealed packets allowing for long term storage…

• 20 varieties of hardy heirloom survival seeds passed down from our forefathers.
• Survival seeds rated for 5+ years of storage at 75F, longer at lower temperatures.
• No hybrids, GMOs, or outdated survival seeds. All harvested seeds are reusable.
• Each seed bank is hand-inspected and packed by our American staff to ensure quality.
• Includes detailed survival seed saving guide.

As for the kinds of seeds contained in the “Vault,” My Patriot Supply says on their site:

Included Patriot Seeds

• Blue Lake Bush Bean – over 150 heirloom seeds
• California Wonder Bell Pepper – over 70 heirloom seeds
• Marketmore Cucumber – over 150 heirloom seeds
• Scarlet Nantes Carrot – over 800 heirloom seeds
• Parris Island Cos Romaine Lettuce – over 900 seeds
• Golden Acre Cabbage – over 530 heirloom seeds
• Detroit Dark Red Beet – over 260 heirloom seeds
• Lincoln Shell Sweet Pea – over 100 heirloom seeds
• Black Turtle Bean – over 70 heirloom seeds
• Beefsteak Tomato – over 180 heirloom seeds
• Champion Radish – over 320 heirloom seeds
• Green Sprouting Broccoli – over 500 heirloom seeds
• Waltham Butternut Winter Squash – over 100 seeds
• Bloomsdale Long Standing Spinach – over 260 seeds
• Yellow Sweet Spanish Onion – over 145 heirloom seeds
• Golden Bantam Sweet Corn – over 250 heirloom seeds
• Hales Best Cantaloupe – over 70 heirloom seeds
• Snowball Cauliflower – over 285 heirloom seeds
• Black Beauty Zucchini – over 50 heirloom seeds
• Crimson Sweet Watermelon – over 60 heirloom seeds

As I mentioned in that last “Project Prepper” post, I plan on starting small with the food garden (remember- I’m new to all this). As such, I doubt I’ll be using many of the varieties of seed at first, let alone every seed contained in a pouch. Which is one of the reasons I chose the Survival Seed Vault. Their pouches are mylar, triple-layered, and resealable, where I should be able to use a few seeds at a time and put the rest back in storage.


“My Patriot Supply, Survival Seed Vault”
YouTube Video

I’ve had my eye on the Survival Seed Vault for a few years now in case the poop ever hits the fan. By purchasing one and trying to grow some of the seeds now instead of just socking away the unopened container for long-term storage, I’ll be able to evaluate the quality of these heirloom, non-GMO seeds from My Patriot Supply, start my food garden, and have the remaining Vault seeds at my disposal should a SHTF-scenario arise.

In the next couple of days, my girlfriend and I will decide which fruit and vegetable seeds from the Vault to plant this spring, taking into account their specific requirements and our ability (inability?) to meet them.

(Editor’s note: Product added to “Gear And Supplies” page)

Christopher E. Hill
Survival And Prosperity (www.survivalandprosperity.com)

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Survival And Prosperity
Est. 2010, Chicagoland, USA
Christopher E. Hill, Editor

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